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Normalising Patients With Gravitation
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Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:06 am
Posts: 147
Post Normalising Patients With Gravitation
Normalising Patients With Gravitation (Sometimes In The Form Of "Advanced" Waves)


How can a person feel, and function, almost normally when some medical exam has shown that he or she has a severe medical problem? I think the answer to this lies in a paper published by Albert Einstein just under a century ago. That paper is "Do gravitational fields play an essential role in the structure of elementary particles?" (“Spielen Gravitationfelder in Aufbau der Elementarteilchen eine Wesentliche Rolle?”, Sitzungsberichte der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, [Math. Phys.], 349-356 [1919] Berlin).


The gravity surrounding us is absolutely everywhere, all the time. If the particles composing both the patient and their treatment (no matter what it may be) include gravitational fields, the patient and treatment would be connected because gravity also fills any intervening space. In 1907, mathematician Hermann Minkowski developed his theory of four-dimensional space-time and applied it to his former student Albert Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity (1905). Ever since, physicists have regarded space and time as inseparable. In 1915, Einstein's General Theory of Relativity described gravity as the curving and warping of space-time. So it makes sense that patient and treatment aren't only connected through "any intervening space" but also through any intervening, inseparable period of time.


This clashes with our belief that the past is gone forever and the future does not exist yet. Yet it opens the possibility that we can connect with our healthy bodies from, say, 30 years ago – or connect with treatments developed after 30 more years of medical progress. The easiest thing to do (though not necessarily the correct one) is to say that Einstein made mistakes, our preconceptions are correct, and there must be another reason for the patient's health and functionality. Connection with treatment through intervening space-time is, of course, entirely possible with absolutely no awareness of the connection. This is a plausible explanation of the placebo effect in which health benefits occur despite no medicine being administered. Conviction that a connection through space-time that benefits health is possible adds consciousness to this possibility: and awareness that treatment is not necessarily restricted to physical contact would likely greatly enhance that placebo effect (religious patients would undoubtedly attribute their health benefits to the power of God or Jesus). As well, conscious participation allows a patient to focus on normalisation of his or her problem and to avoid potentially detrimental connections.


Despite all of the above paragraphs, swallowing prescribed pills and undergoing endoscopies etc is totally indispensable. While benefits may indeed come from placebos and enhanced placebos, no person on Earth has yet learned how to completely submerge his or her senses at will. Our sight, touch, hearing and so on govern our lives – and relentlessly teach us that the only possible treatment comes from the physical encounter of going to the doctor. In a thousand years, doctors may no longer be essential and primary treatment may be the enhanced placebo – but today isn’t in the 31st century. As pointers by today's science to the possibilities of the 31st century - Physicists now believe that entanglement between particles exists everywhere, all the time, and have recently found shocking evidence that it affects the wider, "macroscopic" world that we inhabit.' ["The Weirdest Link" (New Scientist, vol. 181, issue 2440 - 27 March 2004, page 32 - online at http://www.biophysica.com/QUANTUM.HTM]. Caslav Brukner, working with Vlatko Vedral and two other Imperial College researchers, has uncovered a radical twist. They have shown that moments of time can become entangled too ["Quantum Entanglement in Time" by Caslav Brukner, Samuel Taylor, Sancho Cheung, Vlatko Vedral (Submitted on 18 Feb 2004) - http://www.arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0402127].


What do you do if you're suffering some disorder on Earth and your treatment is approx. 2.5 million light years away in the Andromeda galaxy? You might be connected to it, but surely the gravitational waves (ripples in space-time) of the treatment would take millions of years to reach you since gravitational waves only travel at the speed of light (all other electromagnetic waves travel at this velocity, too).


The beginning of the solution is with 19th-century scientist Michael Faraday's experiments with electricity and magnetism (which, later that century, James Clerk Maxwell mathematically unified into a theory of electromagnetism that includes light). The existence of both advanced waves (which travel backwards in time) and retarded waves (which travel forwards in time) as admissible solutions to Maxwell's equations was explored in the Wheeler–Feynman absorber theory in the first half of last century. Also, John Cramer's 1986 proposal of the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics (TIQM) says waves are both retarded and advanced. The waves are seen as physically real, rather than a mere mathematical device. And "Physics of the Impossible" by Michio Kaku (Penguin Books, 2009) states on p.276, "When we solve Maxwell's equations for light, we find not one but two solutions: a 'retarded' wave, which represents the standard motion of light from one point to another; but also an 'advanced' wave, where the light beam goes backward in time. Engineers have simply dismissed the advanced wave as a mathematical curiosity since the retarded waves so accurately predicted the behavior of radio, microwaves, TV, radar, and X-rays. But for physicists, the advanced wave has been a nagging problem for the past century."


Incidentally, Albert Einstein's equations say gravitational fields carry enough information about electromagnetism to allow Maxwell's equations to be restated in terms of these gravitational fields. This was discovered by the mathematical physicist George Yuri Rainich - "Transactions of the American Mathematical Society" 27, 106 - Rainich, G. Y. (1925). Therefore, gravitational waves also have a "retarded" wave and an "advanced" wave. They can travel forward or backward not only in space, but in time too. 17th century scientist Isaac Newton's idea of gravity acting instantly across the universe could be explained by gravity's ability to travel back in time, and thereby reach a point billions of light years away not in billions of years, but apparently instantly^. It could even arrive at that point sooner than instantly. However, that is not a violation of cause and effect, only of our traditional belief that time only moves in the forward direction. The gravitational wave cannot affect a spot at any distance until it begins its journey … until it begins travelling back in time.


^ Instantaneous effect over large distances is known as quantum entanglement and has been repeatedly verified experimentally. Though the effect is measured for distances in space, the inseparability of space and time means that moments of time can become entangled too, as "Quantum Entanglement in Time" (http://www.arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0402127) showed.


Sun Dec 25, 2016 12:47 pm
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Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:06 am
Posts: 147
Post Re: Normalising Patients With Gravitation
NORMALISING PATIENTS WITH GRAVITATION (DENTAL VERSION)


Today, I read an online article about the regeneration of teeth using an Alzheimer's drug (Tideglusib). The article is "Decline of the dentist's drill? Drug helps rotten teeth regenerate, trial shows" By Hannah Devlin Science correspondent, January 9, 2017 (http://www.inkl.com/newsletters/morning ... rial-shows). At this stage, a remaining question is whether the method will scale up successfully to human teeth, in which cavities can be significantly larger.


Maybe the key to human treatment being successfully done today lies in a paper published by Albert Einstein just under a century ago. That paper is "Do gravitational fields play an essential role in the structure of elementary particles?" (“Spielen Gravitationfelder in Aufbau der Elementarteilchen eine Wesentliche Rolle?”, Sitzungsberichte der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, [Math. Phys.], 349-356 [1919] Berlin). The world thinks of this paper as a mistake by Einstein, but maybe it wasn't.


The gravity surrounding us is absolutely everywhere, all the time. If the particles composing both the patient and their treatment (such as Tideglusib) include gravitational fields, the patient and treatment would always be connected because gravity always fills any intervening space. This is a plausible explanation of the placebo effect in which health benefits occur despite no medicine being administered, and being aware of this constant connection would greatly enhance success of the treatment (of course, being conscious of the need to avoid side effects from the drug is also important).


In a thousand years, dentists may no longer be essential and primary treatment may be the enhanced placebo (involving consciousness of connections via gravitation) – but today isn’t in the 31st century. As pointers by today's science to the possibilities of the 31st century, read this - "Physicists now believe that entanglement between particles exists everywhere, all the time, and have recently found shocking evidence that it affects the wider, 'macroscopic' world that we inhabit." ["The Weirdest Link": New Scientist, vol. 181, issue 2440 - 27 March 2004, page 32 - online at http://www.biophysica.com/QUANTUM.HTM]. "Caslav Brukner, working with Vlatko Vedral and two other Imperial College researchers, has uncovered a radical twist. They have shown that moments of time can become entangled too" ["Quantum Entanglement in Time" by Caslav Brukner, Samuel Taylor, Sancho Cheung, Vlatko Vedral (Submitted on 18 Feb 2004) - http://www.arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0402127]. If accurate, this last reference would permit today to connect with the 31st century.


Wed Jan 11, 2017 2:10 am
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Joined: Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:06 am
Posts: 147
Post Re: Normalising Patients With Gravitation
After posting the "Dental Version" on http://www.nature.com/articles/srep3965 ... 3093019169, I received the following thoughtful reply, and my reply to that is included below it:

THE REPLY I RECEIVED

Rodney i like the Einstein gravitational field theory you are propagating to interpret the placebo effect of experimental and established pharmaceuticals. Do you know of any bibliographic references correlating placebo to gravitational field theory? I have a great interest in placebo and nocebo effects. What is your view on the Nocebo effect? how would you interpret nocebo with the gravitational field theory?
Thanks
Alex

MY REPLY

Thanks for liking the gravitational approach, Alex. Science might prove it to be true oneday. At the moment, it can only detect gravitational waves from extreme events like colliding black holes. But it may well be routinely detecting the gravitational waves associated with the body, and with pharmaceuticals, within a century.

I don't know of any bibliographic references. The world seems to think of Einstein's relevant 1919 paper as a mistake, so it's possible nobody else has tried to connect it with placebo and nocebo effects.

These effects just might be a result of consciousness. If so, a person could focus on the positive health benefits (placebo) that come from being connected to a pharmaceutical or other treatment. Or the person could get confused and lose their way mentally, causing them to "home in" on negative qualities like harmful treatments or a drug's side effects (nocebo). A nocebo effect would be more likely if this connection and focusing process is entirely unconscious. To gain placebo benefits, I think a person's focusing would largely be a matter of intuitively "feeling their way". This would be similar to actually swallowing a pharmaceutical - we gain the drug's benefits without ever giving a thought to what our body's doing with that pill.


Wed Jan 11, 2017 3:31 am
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